Earth Day ’16

ATTACHED:  NAACP Nutrition.3 is our course built on three nationally recognized web sites Earth Day’16-Page 1 &4 and  Earth Day ’16 pages 2 & 3 program completed by Dr. Blondell Strong  BURNT and the NAACP have opted for nutrition as a tool to impact environmental justice in poor and minority youth.  Last year we did a one day event at the Hadley Park Community Center which worked with 55 youth.  We developed a strong curriculum this year.  We were not able to establish a supply of teachers or a supply of high school and junior high students to teach.  Recruiting teachers of classes and classes to teach became complicated toward the end of the school year,.  We were very fortunate that a committee member knew the Maplewood principal.       First recommendation–start organizing before the beginning of the semester.. We recruited three teachers from Hands on Nashville, one from Meharry Medical College, and three from David Lipscomb University.  We should start much earlier to recruit from college clubs and professional classes such as nutrition and nursing.  Recruiting places to teach by starting with the school board members representing where we wish to teach.    We discussed stipends.  First, we did not have time to get them. Second, if it takes $25 to persuade someone to do something how deep is their interest.  Finally, making payments and record keeping. RECOMMENDATION    The poor and minority who go to prison are the ones who can not read in 4th grade.   Some churches have on-going tutoring of young students who can not read and write.  Perhaps we can activate NAACP members by feeding them into these church tutoring programs FINAL  RECOMMENDATION   Next year is our 5th Anniversary...

TDEC Develops Solid Waste Plan 2015-2025

The Division of Solid Waste recently unveiled their Solid Waste Plan 2015-2025 (available here). The new Plan embraced all the elements of the past with vague promises for change.  Tennessee will remain the only state to credit landfilled construction waste as diverted, wildly inaccurate local reports will be expanded, and emphasis on rural waste will remain instead of larger counties which create the majority of solid waste.  Sometime in the future, regulations for landfills will be reviewed even though there are amply regulations now to control landfill pollution. Below is a letter to a State Solid Waste Board member then a longer letter to the Commissioner. “11 April 2015 Alan Leiserson, Member Underground Storage Tanks and Solid Waste Control Board You and I have a unique view on the Solid Waste Plan 2015-2025.  We testified before a Joint Government Operations Rule Committee in December 2011 where the Plan was a central point.  The Committee could not understand how I could oppose a TDEC Planning  effort. This Plan perfectly expresses that opposition. This Plan does nothing except continue the present status of Tennessee solid waste.  There is nothing but vague promises for future change.  The loop-hole riddled  local reporting where local governments report only on what they personally collect and guess on the rest, the unique  to Tennessee rule of allowing landfilled construction waste to count as diverted which inflates Tennessee recycling numbers, and the polluting landfills are ignored. The Department states that only complaints from local citizens will trigger remediation of landfills even though Tennessee is ranked 44th among all states in well being which reflects education, citizen participation, job opportunities,...

BURNT AT METRO COUNCIL — Are We a Super City or Ranked #72?

Nashville has been on a self-congratulatory jag since the New York Times wrote a laudatory article about Nashville. BURNT has been in an office playing a loop on closed circuit television of top ten accomplishments of Nashville ranging from most performance reviews to number of head quarters companies per capita. Nashville is a hot city – or are we number #72, as ranked by the Gallup Poll? In a Healthways article, Nashville was #44 among states on the same ‘wellness’ scale. BURNT points out the terrible inequalities among colleges, the abuse of General hospital by Metro government and Vanderbilt, and the disparity in income between North Nashville and Davidson County. We would say the General Assembly–largely made of former local officials–has the firmest grip on the reality of the bottom level of citizens in Tennessee. Click to read or download our flyer addressing this...

Task Force Plans for Waste Reduction

CLICK THE BELOW TEXT TO VIEW THE PDF Solid Waste Task Force—A Wasted Effort  The ‘Solid Waste Task Force’  met from 2007 to 2009 to develop parameters for new solid waste regulations  following legislative passage of Public Chapter 0462.  This legislation was an omnibus  solid waste bill covering waste recovery  following disasters, work place recycling, and new solid waste  regulations.  Public Chapter 0462 allowed the Board to assume  powers to create regulations previously reserved for General Assembly  if a wide range of factors  such as jobs created, public education, and the costs and benefits of recycling were considered.  .    The Task Force was created to do this research.  The ‘Task Force’ populated with local public works leaders from across the state and several concerned citizens.  Two members of BURNT participated.  The Task Force considered a wide range of evidence and developed recommendations to reduce landfills, increase recycling and composting, and implement basic solid waste management.  This followed the dictates of Public Chapter 0462.  TDEC, and the Board, twisted these recommendations to then create a Rule 0400-11-01-.09 which overrode the recommendations of the Task Force while claiming to follow them.   Please see attached “waste reduction rule” to see that the rule continues the existing gaping loop-holes such as credit toward 25% recycling goal for landfilled construction waste.  Plus, the Rule added that changes in production process could be claimed by business toward the 25% goal with no proof of efficacy.     Please understand the high quality of state and local officials on the Task Force.  Local solid waste directors showed up with books on ‘Zero Waste’.  State managers are outstanding....

Mission

‘Improving the Environment Through Citizen Involvement’ With Government, Business, and Academia’ BURNT provides education and advocacy to areas of Tennessee affected by chronic polluters and landfills. BURNT seeks to provide alternative uses for solid waste that is safe for the community and environment and creates jobs by managing waste as a raw material for jobs and business. BURNT has worked to ensure safe use of pesticides in Metro Schools, control of mosquitoes, and to research spread of dangerous chemicals throughout the environment and within humans....

HISTORY

BURNT is a 24  Year Old Environmental Group A  Clean  Environment Is Good  For Business Business and Development Plan  Closing chronic polluters increased commercial real estate value ‘ throughout Nashville Tennessee landfills—manage solid waste as a raw material for jobs and business. Working within multiple agencies of Metro Nashville, State government, and across the state based on years of research, success, and participation Bring Urban Recycling to Nashville Today (“BURNT”) is a not for profit 501(c)(3) corporation founded in December 1988.  BURNT is dedicated to environmental advocacy, specifically concerning landfills, solid waste disposal, pesticides, and multiple chemicals. 7 November 2013 BURNT was founded in December 1988 at a meeting at the Vanderbilt Center for Health Services to discuss the $200 million expansion of the downtown Nashville incinerator. This was also the first major neighborhood issue in Nashville–East Nashville residents were concerned about noxious fumes from the incinerator and Germantown residents were concerned because the incinerator ash trucks  ran through Germantown. The Cumberland Green Bio-Region Council provided energy, people, and drive. One instance—The drummers of the Cumberland green bio region Council came to a Metro Council meeting. At 7 pm. The start of the Metro Council meeting the drumming on the sidewalks began. Immediate calls for cessation or moving back came. The drummers moved back and started drumming again. “Wait, Not enough move further back” Which they did until they made their point—bad noise drives out good noise and in this case the good noise was the music of the people. We worked with both East Nashville and Germantown neighborhoods on the Rendering Plant which processed meal oils from restaurants...