Events

BURNT stays active through events both internal and external. Check out the blog below for posts about upcoming or recent BURNT functions or gatherings at public hearings.

Earth Day ’16

ATTACHED:  NAACP Nutrition.3 is our course built on three nationally recognized web sites Earth Day’16-Page 1 &4 and  Earth Day ’16 pages 2 & 3 program completed by Dr. Blondell Strong  BURNT and the NAACP have opted for nutrition as a tool to impact environmental justice in poor and minority youth.  Last year we did a one day event at the Hadley Park Community Center which worked with 55 youth.  We developed a strong curriculum this year.  We were not able to establish a supply of teachers or a supply of high school and junior high students to teach.  Recruiting teachers of classes and classes to teach became complicated toward the end of the school year,.  We were very fortunate that a committee member knew the Maplewood principal.       First recommendation–start organizing before the beginning of the semester.. We recruited three teachers from Hands on Nashville, one from Meharry Medical College, and three from David Lipscomb University.  We should start much earlier to recruit from college clubs and professional classes such as nutrition and nursing.  Recruiting places to teach by starting with the school board members representing where we wish to teach.    We discussed stipends.  First, we did not have time to get them. Second, if it takes $25 to persuade someone to do something how deep is their interest.  Finally, making payments and record keeping. RECOMMENDATION    The poor and minority who go to prison are the ones who can not read in 4th grade.   Some churches have on-going tutoring of young students who can not read and write.  Perhaps we can activate NAACP members by feeding them into these church tutoring programs FINAL  RECOMMENDATION   Next year is our 5th Anniversary...

BURNT Event: “Can Nashville Recycle More?”

On Tuesday November 17 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Richland Park Library 4711 Charlotte BURNT will sponsor a presentation and discussion on “Can Nashville Recycle More?”  BURNT will explain what is in solid waste and why more waste can be recycled and composted.  The relationship between state solid waste law and metro practices will be considered.  The factors evident in Oregon and California, two high recycling state, will be discussed to see how to improve Nashville recycling. The event is free and open to the public. See the flyer below....

Earth Day Recap…

55 youth, adults, and NAACP members gathered at the Hadley Park Community Center on Earth Day, April 22, to celebrate Environmental  Justice Earth Day with a program geared toward youth and nutrition. BURNT has a long history of observing environmental justice. Our issues–solid waste, landfills, chemicals, and pesticides have a significant impact on poor and minority.  Those with the worst health suffer the greatest pollution yet have the fewest tools to fight back.  Our events are targeted toward poor and minority.   At the “Environmental Justice Earth Day” we taught the youth that 50% of their calories came from sugar in soft drinks.  We thank Ms. Barbara A. Manual the Director of  the Hadley Park Community Center for hosting this event three years in a row. Dr. Blondell Strong and the NAACP compiled the program.  Community Food Advocates, Green Fork Academy, Master Gardeners of Davidson County,  Earth Saver’s-TN, and the NAACP were among those groups which participate.   Attached is the program for the event: Earth Day Program 2015...

3rd Annual “Environmental Justice Earth Day” Delivers Food and Nutrition to Minority Youth

On 22 April 2015, the 45th Anniversary of the founding of Earth Day, the Nashville Branch of the NAACP and BURNT will lead a coalition of community groups to deliver a strong message to poor and minority youth on food and nutrition  at the Hadley Park Community Center from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Community Food Advocates and  their Mobile Food Market will be there for the youth to tour and to give information on food deserts.  Green Fork Academy will prepare a  healthy snack for participants and discuss nutrition. A representative of Mathew Walker will discuss diabetes and other illnesses in which nutrition plays a role.   Former Metro Council member Kwame Lillard will talk about environmental justice. The Master Gardeners will distribute seedlings and plants. Earth Savers-TN will discuss composting and gardening. BACKGROUND:Earth Day was founded on April 22 1970 and is considered the beginning of the modern environmental movement. ‘Environmental Justice Earth Day’ began as a Resolution written by the Nashville NAACP and adapted by the National NAACP. The Resolution will be available at the event and all participants will be available for interviews. View/download event...

BURNT Fails At General Assembly To Connect Air Quality to Landfills

BURNT  does a lot of work at the General Assembly which is not related to specific legislation.  Over the years,we have helped educate the legislature on problems of solid waste and landfills.  For this hearing of the Joint Government Operations Rule Committee we tried to link the refusal of the State Air Quality Board and Air Quality Department to consider odors.  Of course, this is quite strange behavior for an Air Quality Board–how can a State Air Quality Board ignore odors?  However, we found the General Assembly was not interested in this point.  It may be considered unfriendly to business. BURNT has worked two odor cases in Nashville (the four largest cities have identical enabling laws to the State which are interpreted to allow them to regulate air quality).  In both cases involving odors, businesses thrived after the offending plant was closed or regulated.  Of course, farms are a germane point against regulation. Here are examples of citizen testimony about Middle Point landfill in Murfreesboro on August 22 2013: Ms C.W.  –“…the smell [Murfreesboro landfill] is really bad on some days…[the people who live in] Walter Hill should not have to smell the odors that are emitted ” Pre-Hearing Comment #1, pg. 1 of 35 ** Mr. J. R. —“I live about 1 ½ miles from the landfill as the crow flies.  I have lived in my house for 28 years.  For the first 18 years it was not an issue.  In the last 10 years it has been a major issue.  Being able to go out and sit on my porch in the back and have to put up with...

BURNT Goes To Metro Council

BURNT attends many Metro Council meetings because of the issues and talented elected and non-elected people participate.  We usually have a written flyer which leaves a record of our issues.  On May 20 2014 (mis-labeled mc20april2014), we discussed the Murfreesboro landfill used by Metro and which state officials continue to insist does pollute or cause odor problems. Testimony at the hearing about the Middle Point landfill in August 2013 stated   “I live about 1 ½ miles from the landfill as the crow flies. I have lived in my house for 28 years. For the first 18 years it was not an issue. In the last 10 years it has been a major issue. Being able to go out and sit on my porch in the back and have to put up with this smell and all the poor air quality that’s coming from the landfill”. Hearing Comment #9, pg. 18-19. Mass transit continues to be a challenge in Nashville.  We appreciate the efforts of the city leadership to tackle this problem.  It has been very difficult.  Yet, lost in the shuffle  is that compared to cities like Charlotte North Carolina and Denver,  Nashville has a woeful transit system losing ground yearly.  It would seem that doing any thing would be preferable even if later the first choice of route and transport was seen to be the 3rd or 4th best option                                               NASHVILLE NUMBERS–Metro budget hearing This is for the Citizen Budget hearing, a formality (mcJune2014).  Yet, the “BURNT Numbers” encapsulate many issues ranging from income...

Open Letter to AFL-CIO: Jobs and business from solid waste

BURNT IMPROVING THE ENVIRONMENT THROUGH CITIZEN INVOLVEMENT WITH GOVERNMENT, BUSINESS, AND ACADEMIA 12 March 2012 Gary Moore President Tennessee AFL-CIO 1901 Lindell Avenue via electronic mail and hand delivery RE: Jobs and business from solid waste Dear President Moore: Thank you for the opportunity to discuss how to manage solid waste as a raw material to create jobs and business. This is a growth opportunity for clean jobs. Tennessee landfills 11 million tons of waste at a cost to citizens, business, and local government of $1 billion annually. Solid waste is transported 10 million miles annually from cities to landfills. Landfills are our organizing focus. There are fundamental solutions—compost food waste and non-recycled paper, recycle and reuse construction waste, and source separation of food waste in homes and business. Environmental justice is very important—reduce landfills near poor and minority and we create jobs and business for poor and minority. We are active with the NAACP is active on this issue. The logic is very clear—it pays to recycle and compost to recover materials and to recover energy from highly processed solid waste. Labor can lead in management and research. Food waste composting and reuse of construction waste creates jobs. Simple steps such as individual source separation of food waste in residential and business greatly enhance creating new jobs and business. Food waste is valuable as compost material but very harmful if landfilled. Polluted landfills and high hidden costs to landfills are the key to solid waste reform. Our waste is laden with risky chemicals. BURNT offers strong opportunities for solid waste in our work on landfills. On 11-12 April,...

25 Years of Dedication

BURNT 25th Anniversary Thursday 12 December BURNT’s    25th  Anniversary Reception ON STAGE PERFORMING… The Cantrell’s  at 6:30 Thursday  12 December 2013 5 p.m.—8 p.m. LOCATION: The Entrepreneur Center 41 Peabody Street Rolling Mill Hill Nashville, Tennessee     Program 5:45 p.m. Dr. Robert Wingfield, Department of Chemistry, Fisk University, Keynote Speaker Honors for elected officials and citizens Donations welcome so that we can continue our efforts to improve our government and recycling contribute via…...